Search for rkid_genus group:urn:lsid:biodiversity.org.au:afd.taxon:a38442cb-d0ce-4fe2-8e44-a596e093bf6f returned 532 results.

  1. Site Page: Bushcare group use ALA in suburban Brisbane – Atlas of Living Australia

    Posted on 21st November 2017 Since finding out about the ALA, the Rocky Waterholes-Salisbury Bushcare group have been using it in a number of ways to enhance their site in suburban Brisbane. Bushcare groups are made up of volunteers across Australia who come together to restore natural environments in urban reserves. Among other activities, the Rocky Waterholes-Salisbury group cleans up rubbish, removes weeds, and propagates and plants native shrubs and trees...

  2. Site Page: Teacher adds first colour images of underwater species to ALA – Atlas of Living Australia

    Posted on 24th April 2018 Victorian teacher Nick Shaw’s images of unusual underwater creatures with beautiful colouring quickly caught our eye. After further investigation, it turned out that some of Nick’s images were the first images of these species in the ALA that were not museum holotypes. Having images of these creatures in their natural environment is valuable...

  3. Site Page: ALA in use: Dave Maynard, Environmental Consultant – Atlas of Living Australia

    Posted on 2nd July 2018 We talk with an ecologist and environmental consultant, about how he uses the ALA to inform environmental impact assessments and offset planning for development projects. Dave Maynard, Principal Ecologist, NGH Environmental, in his ‘office’ on the Central Tablelands of New South Wales with the threatened Eucalyptus pulverulenta (Silver-leafed Mountain Gum)...

  4. Site Page: Deserved recognition for ecoscience education program – Atlas of Living Australia

    Posted on 24th June 2019 This article first appeared in the TERN newsletter June 2019. Australia’s national training program for environmental science digital research infrastructure,  ecoEd, has been honoured as a finalist in the inaugural CAUDIT awards in the category of Innovation in Teaching and Learning...

  5. Site Page: Data in the ALA: bushfire affected areas (2019-2020 bushfire season) – Atlas of Living Australia

    Posted on 30th September 2020 The national dataset of bushfire affected areas for the 2019-20 bushfire season is accessible in the Atlas of Living Australia. Image by Teresa Bealey (CC-BY-NC-4.0) submitted to the University of New South Wales’ Environment Recovery Project: Australian Bushfires 2019-2020 on iNaturalist Australia. This dataset shows all areas of Australia affected by the 2019-2020 bushfires...

  6. Site Page: Bubble bum: Rare bee wee caught on camera – Atlas of Living Australia

    Posted on 10th December 2020 Amateur naturalist Liz Barratt caught this candid photo of a European Honey Bee on her property in Moffatdale, Queensland. European Honey Bee (Apis mellifera) caught on camera by Liz Barratt (All rights reserved © lizbarratt). “This was the first year I’d seen our bottlebrush in full bloom and it had a lot of bees around it so I got my camera out.  I sat there for several hours over several days just happily snapping away and watching them,” Liz said...

  7. Site Page: Morphbank – Atlas of Living Australia

    Posted on 22nd June 2010 ALA is setting up a Morphbank Australian mirrored node. Morphbank is a scientific image repository. ALA’s new Image Repository – Morphbank Peter Brenton and Robyn Lawrence, Atlas of Living Australia. The Atlas of Living Australia (ALA) is excited to join forces with Morphbank, the long-established international repository for the scientific curation of online biological images...

  8. Site Page: Sharing data through the Atlas – Atlas of Living Australia

    Posted on 26th October 2009 This is a DRAFT – please send us your comments and suggestions. Background Different researchers and institutions capture and store data in the forms and combinations which best meet their needs. However, in order to make these data more widely accessible and to ensure that they can be reused for different purposes, data providers need […] This is a DRAFT – please send us your comments and suggestions...

  9. Site Page: Layers (Add to Map) – Atlas of Living Australia

    Posted on 30th January 2012 Layers are used to overlay both environmental and contextual layers on the map. To add a new layer, select from the Menu Option, “Add To Map”, then “Layers”. This Layers option maps any of the layers available in our Layer Library. On this page, there are a few links to view/download information in the form of a table about each of the layers in the Atlas...

  10. Site Page: Atlas of Living Australia – making field guides accessible – Atlas of Living Australia

    Posted on 12th December 2012   The Atlas of Living Australia now has over 35 million records on Australian species freely and openly available through their website. What is not commonly known is that all the capabilities behind the delivery and visualisation of these records are also freely available via open “web services...