Search for rkid_genus group:urn:lsid:biodiversity.org.au:afd.taxon:a38442cb-d0ce-4fe2-8e44-a596e093bf6f returned 532 results.

  1. Support article: How to record a sighting

    Currently, there are two ways to submit sightings to the ALA.  1) Through iNaturalist Australia ALA now manages the Australian node of iNaturalist – the world’s leading social network for biodiversity. We recommend ALA users upload individual observations to iNaturalist Australia. iNaturalist Australia uses community expertise and image recognition to help users identify species...

  2. Support article: Can I still use the Record a Sighting function on the ALA?

    ALA's Record a Sighting function is still available and will continue for the time being, but we are asking our users to make a change and use iNaturalist Australia to record sightings. In iNaturalist they're called observations. What will happen to the records in the ALA's "Record a Sighting" function? All of the records contributed via the ALA's Record A Sighting function and the OzAtlas apps are regularly harvested over to the ALA's main database, so they won't be lost...

  3. Site Page: CSIRO – Virtual Taxonomy Laboratory – Atlas of Living Australia

    Posted on 10th April 2010 By John La Salle, Head, Australian National Insect Collection, CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences In September 2009, CSIRO and the Chinese Academy of Sciences opened a Virtual Taxonomy Laboratory (VTL) between the Australian National Insect Collection and the Institute of Zoology in Beijing. The VTL will accelerate taxonomic collaboration and productivity via web-based activities...

  4. Site Page: April Newsletter 2011 – Atlas of Living Australia

    Posted on 15th April 2011 Director’s Report Atlas developments in 2011. Read » Atlas Partners Museum volunteers help with rapid digitisation. Read » New Climatewatch website launched. Read » Next-generation portals for herbaria and museums. Read » Queensland Museum collections safe from floods. Read » The value of biological collections. Read » Traditional owners welcome first Victorian BushBlitz. Read » […] Director’s Report Atlas developments in 2011...

  5. Site Page: ‘Barcoding blitz’ on Australian moths and butterflies – Atlas of Living Australia

    Posted on 5th May 2011 Media Release In just 10 weeks a team of Canadian researchers has succeeded in ‘barcoding’ 28,000 moth and butterfly specimens – or about 65 per cent of Australia’s 10,000 known species – held at CSIRO’s Australian National Insect Collection (ANIC) in Canberra...

  6. Site Page: Beauty from nature: art of the Scott sisters – Atlas of Living Australia

    Posted on 30th August 2011 An exhibition featuring illustrations of butterflies, moths, caterpillars and plants by Harriet and Helena Scott, two of 19th century Australia’s most prominent natural history artists will be held at the Australian Museum in Sydney on 3 September – 27 November 2011. Highlights of the exhibition are 60 watercolour paintings created between 1846 and 1851 for their father A.W. Scott’s landmark publication Australian Lepidoptera and their Transformations...

  7. Site Page: Tasmanian Herbarium – Atlas of Living Australia

    The Tasmanian Herbarium, part of the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery (Department of State Growth), is responsible for the development, maintenance and management of the botanical collections of Tasmania. The preserved plant specimens (more than 255,000) that make up the Tasmanian Herbarium are internationally acknowledged as the most comprehensive record of the Tasmanian flora in the world...

  8. Site Page: Citizen Science and Biosecurity: bee alert and bee alarmed – Atlas of Living Australia

    Posted on 8th April 2015 Australian Citizen Scientists are busy (like bees!) documenting the spread of an exotic and invasive South African carder bee, Afranthidium Immanthidium repetitum. Through the great work of the BowerBird community, the Atlas of Living Australia has learnt that the known distribution for this species has increased significantly. From what was first recorded in Brisbane in 2000, Sydney in 2007, and recent records in Rockhampton and Albury lodged in late 2014...

  9. Site Page: EcoEd training for first-rate science education – Atlas of Living Australia

    Posted on 29th June 2017 The Atlas of Living Australia (ALA) has joined forces with Biodiversity and Climate Change Virtual Laboratory (BCCVL) and Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) to deliver an exciting and innovative new training program called EcoEd...

  10. Site Page: Updates to ALA’s name and taxonomy index – Atlas of Living Australia

    Posted on 6th November 2017 Two improvements to the ALA’s naming and taxonomy index within the BIE (Biodiversity Information Explorer) have just been released. The BIE is the taxonomic backbone of the ALA, underpinning information for over 120,000 species. 1. All sources of name and taxonomic information are now visible Data in the BIE is aggregated from many sources across Australia and New Zealand, such as the Australian Faunal Directory (AFD) or the New Zealand Organisms Register...