Search for rkid_genus group:urn:lsid:biodiversity.org.au:afd.taxon:a38442cb-d0ce-4fe2-8e44-a596e093bf6f returned 532 results.

  1. Support article: The ALA’s Data Quality Project

    The Data Quality Project is being led by Miles Nicholls (former ALA Data Manager), supported by ALA senior management and the development team. The project aims to: Improve the ways users can assess data quality or fitness-for-purpose, improve reliability of data (e.g. taxonomic names, quality of species identifications) Enhance ALA users’ understanding of the type of data in the ALA, and their attributes, and ways to assess fitness-for-use...

  2. Site Page: Queensland Museum collections safe from floods – Atlas of Living Australia

    Posted on 23rd March 2011 By Dr John Hooper, Head of Biodiversity & Geosciences Programs, Queensland Museum Minor flooding underneath the Queensland Museum South Bank, 13th January 2011 The recent floods in Brisbane, thankfully below the 1974 flood levels, resulted in minor water damage to Queensland Museum’s South Bank campus (QMSB). No collection areas or internal public exhibition galleries were breached. The underground car parks and the external Energex Playasaurus Place were flooded...

  3. Site Page: International Barcode of Life Conference, Adelaide – Atlas of Living Australia

    Posted on 8th April 2011 The 4th International Barcode of Life Conference will be held at the University of Adelaide between 28th November and 3rd December, 2011. It will include: Monday, Tuesday, 28 to 29 Nov: Short courses and special presentations on barcoding informatics and lab procedures. Wednesday to Saturday, 30 Nov to 3 Dec: Main Conference...

  4. Site Page: A new adventure game that gets you off the couch and into the wild – Atlas of Living Australia

    Posted on 4th April 2014 Spending too much time with your nose to your computer screen? Instead of playing games hunched over a console why not try QuestaBird, a new Android game which will take you outside and into the bush. Using your phone to photograph birds, butterflies and moths, the game involves competing with others to collect the most species and the greatest number of animals in your area...

  5. Site Page: Queensland Museum – Atlas of Living Australia

        Established in 1862, the Queensland Museum is a museum of natural history, cultural heritage, science and human achievement. It operates six campuses across Queensland, and is custodian to approximately 16 million specimens and objects that are material evidence of the changing natural and cultural history of Queensland in particular, and tropical Australasia in general...

  6. Site Page: Australian National Fish Collection – Atlas of Living Australia

        CSIRO is the custodian of a number of collections of animal and plant specimens and data that contribute to national and international biological knowledge. Collectively they form the National Research Collections of Australia (NRCA).   The Australian National Fish Collection (ANFC) was established in 1943 by Ian Munro, a former fisheries scientist at CSIRO, while preparing books on fish species from the Indo-Pacific region...

  7. Site Page: NSW South Coast: December 2015 BioBlitz – Atlas of Living Australia

    Posted on 26th November 2015 The Atlas of Life in the Coastal Wilderness will be running a BioBlitz in the Wallagoot catchment region near Merimbula NSW on Friday 4th and Saturday 5th of December 2015,  with a basecamp situated at the Bournda Environmental Education Centre. BioBlitzes bring scientists, naturalists, and public volunteers (Citizen Scientists) together to explore and record biodiversity information and learn about local ecological communities...

  8. Site Page: getLSID Spreadsheet Macro – Atlas of Living Australia

    Posted on 3rd January 2012 The following Microsoft Excel macro (getLsid.zip) was a by-product of the development of the Spatial Portal.  You enter a scientific name into the spreadsheet and an LSID (and much else) will be returned. LSIDs are used throughout the bioinformatics world. A generated set of LSIDs could be used in other Atlas’ tools besides the Spatial Portal, or in other biodiversity informatics systems. Note: The macro will not work for Macs as is...

  9. Site Page: Spotlight on ALA users: Amateur photographer Steve Dew – Atlas of Living Australia

    Posted on 18th April 2016 Have you ever wondered who else is using the Atlas of Living Australia? For our new blog series Spotlight on Users, we looked through our recent sightings and contacted contributors to find out how and why they use the ALA. Steven Dew is an amateur photographer based in Queensland...

  10. Site Page: Spotlight on ALA users: Dr Anne Musser, Honorary Research Associate, Australian Museum – Atlas of Living Australia

    Posted on 4th May 2016 Dr Anne Musser, Honorary Research Associate with the Australian Museum, and a guide and palaeontologist at Jenolan Caves, is using the ALA to record biodiversity in the Jenolan Karst Conservation Reserve, near Oberon, NSW. One of Anne’s passions is to walk around the reserve after work and photograph all the wildlife she can find. She has added many sightings to the ALA, both animals and plants, and has many more to add...