Name source
Australian Faunal Directory
Rank
species
Data links
LSID JSON / WMS /RDF

Life Science Identifier (LSID):

urn:lsid:biodiversity.org.au:afd.taxon:0c3e2403-05c4-4a43-8019-30e6d657a283

LSIDs are persistent, location-independent,resource identifiers for uniquely naming biologically significant resources including species names, concepts, occurrences, genes or proteins, or data objects that encode information about them. To put it simply, LSIDs are a way to identify and locate pieces of biological information on the web.

Data Links

JSON

For a JSON view of this data, click here

WMS

To use WMS services, copy and paste the following GetCapabilities URL into your OGC client (e.g. uDIG, ESRI ArcGIS)
http://biocache.ala.org.au/ws/ogc/ows?q=species:Carcharias taurus
For higher taxa, this will give you a hierarchical listing of layers for each taxon.

RDF

To download an RDF/XML document for the concepts and names click here
A JSON view of this information is here here
A html view of this information is here here

Further details

For more details on occurrence webservices, click here
For more details on names webservices, click here

Species presence
 Recorded In Australia
 Marine Habitats
Conservation status
VICData Deficient or Delisted
AUCritically Endangered
AUVulnerable
QLDEndangered
VICListed under FFG Act
WAVulnerable
IUCNVulnerable

Occurrence records map

occurrence map map legend

View records list Map & analyse records

  • representative image of taxa
    Source: Australian National Fish Collection Images
    Image by: Carley Bansemer
    Rights: Carley Bansemer

Description

The eyes of the sand tiger shark tend to be small,lacking eyelids, one of the shark's many distinct characteristics. The head is rather pointy, as opposed to round, while the snout is flattened with a conical shape. Its body is stout and bulky and its mouth extends beyond the eyes. The sand tiger shark usually swims with its mouth open displaying three rows of protruding, smooth-edged, sharp-pointed teeth. ... source: Wikipedia

The grey nurse shark is grey–brown to bronze above and off white below. This countershaded, cryptic, colouration is typical of species that swim in open water.Juveniles have reddish or brownish spots on the posterior half of the body.The females reach a maximum length of 3.2 m while males grow to 2.6 m (Compagno 1984; Branstetter and Musick 1994).... source: Northern Territory Threatened Species List

The Greynurse Shark is grey-brown, pale brown or grey on top with whitish underside. The two dorsal fins and the anal fin are similar in size. It has a short pointed snout and small eyes. The tail has a distinct notch in the top lobe. Juveniles have darker spots that fade with age. Greynurse Shark is the only shark known to gulp and store air in its stomach to provide buoyancy. ... source: OZ Animals

Online resources

Australian National Fish Collection Images
Authoritative image
Encyclopedia of Life
Description, Video Page Url, Images
Museum Victoria provider for OZCAM
Images, Occurrence record
Northern Territory Threatened Species List
Description, Distribution, Threats
OZ Animals
Description, Distribution, Morphology, Habitat, Diet, Reproduction
Reef Life Survey Images
Images, Occurrence record
Seafood Services Australia
CAAB Code, Author
Wikipedia
Description, Habitat, Conservation, Reference, Images

Species Lists

RLS profile v3
Abundance: 1.789
Common_Name: Grey Nurse Shark;
Depth: 1–190 m
Description: The grey nurse shark is the only large species of shark seen regularly on coastal reefs in southern Australia. The species can be quickly identified by the two large dorsal fins. while grey nurse sharks are now considered harmless unless antagonised, they were once considered man-eaters, probably solely because of a ferocious appearance with long front teeth exposed. After a period of needless slaughter to the 1990s, the species is now fully protected in Australia. Population numbers are, however, extremely low, with only a few hundred individuals surviving off the Australian east coast. Population recovery has been retarded by a very low birth rate
Diet: Fishes
Distribution: Around the Australian mainland. Also widespread overseas.
Frequency: 0.674
Habitat: Exposed reef
IUCN_Threat_status: Vulnerable
Invasive: Not known to be invasive
Life_History: Juveniles develop teeth within the uterus at about 100 mm size and then hunt and eat each other there, with only a single animal surviving from each litter to be released into the sea
Max_size: 3.2 m
Range: 866.116
Synonyms: Eugomphodus taurus
Threats: Recreational and commercial fishing bycatch
state listed spp (non EPBC)
EPBC_list_02072013
Western Australia : Conservation Status / Sensitive Species Lists
category: VU
IUCN red list 2011.2
Advisory List of Threatened Vertebrate Fauna in Victoria 2013
vernacular name: Grey Nurse Shark
VIC Advisory List: Data Deficient
South Australian Fish from the AFD

Names and sources

Accepted name Source
Carcharias taurus

Synonyms

Synonyms Source
Eugomphodus taurus (Rafinesque, 1810)
Published in: Compagno, L.J.V. 1984. FAO Species Catalogue. Sharks of the World. An annotated and illustrated catalogue of shark species known to date. Hexanchiformes to Lamniformes. FAO Fisheries Synopsis No. 125 Rome : FAO Vol. 4 pp. pp. 1-249
Eugomphodus taurus (Rafinesque, 1810) (Rafinesque, 1810)
Odontaspis taurus (Rafinesque, 1810)
Published in: Coleman, N. 1980. Australian Sea Fishes South of 30ºS Lane Cove, NSW : Doubleday Australia Pty Ltd pp. 309 pp.
Odontaspis taurus (Rafinesque, 1810) (Rafinesque, 1810)
Odontaspis cinerea Ramsay, 1880 Ramsay, 1880
Published in: Ramsay, E.P. 1880. Notes on Galeocerdo rayneri, with a list of other sharks taken in Port Jackson. Proc. Linn. Soc. N.S.W. Ser. 1 Vol. 5 (1) pp. 95-97 fig. 4
Carcharias arenarius Ogilby, 1911 Ogilby, 1911
Published in: Ogilby, J.D. 1911. Descriptions of new or insufficiently described fishes from Queensland waters. Ann. Qld Mus. Vol. 10 pp. 36-58 figs 5-6

Common Names

Common name Source
Greynurse Shark
Is this a preferred common name for this species? YES | NO
Blue Nurse Shark
Is this a preferred common name for this species? YES | NO
Grey Nurse Shark
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Nuss Shark
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Sand Shark
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Sand Tiger
Is this a preferred common name for this species? YES | NO
Sand Tiger Shark
Is this a preferred common name for this species? YES | NO
Shovel-nosed Shark
Is this a preferred common name for this species? YES | NO
Spotted Ragged Tooth
Is this a preferred common name for this species? YES | NO
Spotted Ragged-tooth Shark
Is this a preferred common name for this species? YES | NO
Blue-nurse Sand Tiger
Is this a preferred common name for this species? YES | NO
Dogfish Shark
Is this a preferred common name for this species? YES | NO
Gray Nurse Shark
Is this a preferred common name for this species? YES | NO
Grey Nurse
Is this a preferred common name for this species? YES | NO
Grey Nurse Shark (east Coast Population)
Is this a preferred common name for this species? YES | NO
Grey Nurse Shark (west Coast Population)
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Ground Shark
Is this a preferred common name for this species? YES | NO
Sand-tiger
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Sandtiger Shark
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Slender-tooth Shark
Is this a preferred common name for this species? YES | NO
Spotted Ragged-tooth
Is this a preferred common name for this species? YES | NO
Spotted Raggedtooth
Is this a preferred common name for this species? YES | NO
Spotted Raggedtooth Shark
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Spotted Sand Tiger Shark
Is this a preferred common name for this species? YES | NO

Working classification

kingdom
ANIMALIA
phylum
CHORDATA
subphylum
VERTEBRATA
suprageneric
GNATHOSTOMATA
suprageneric
PISCES
class
CHONDRICHTHYES
subclass
ELASMOBRANCHII
order
LAMNIFORMES
family
ODONTASPIDIDAE
genus
Carcharias
species
Carcharias taurus  Recorded in Australia

Occurrence records

View list of all occurrence records for this taxon

Charts showing breakdown of occurrence records

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Name references found in the Biodiversity Heritage Library

Name references found in the TROVE - NLA

Genbank

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